Fire the Boss

Want Happier Employees? Get Rid of the Bosses

If your employees are spending much of their time doing things simply because they have to, don’t be surprised if they seem a little less than motivated. I noticed this was happening at my company. So I decided to get rid of all the layers.

By ILYA POZIN, Time Magazine

For many employees, a job is a place they go because they have to. They have to pay the bills. They have to get in by 8, work 8 hours, and leave by 5. They have to report to their boss because he has to report to his boss who has to report to… you get the idea.

If your employees are spending well over a third of their time doing things simply because they have to, it should come as no surprise if they seem, well, a little less than motivated.

I noticed this was happening at my company. Our top-down hierarchy only reinforced the problem. Employees were working in silos, instead of collectively, because they couldn’t really see how and where they fit into the overarching goals of the business. They completed tasks simply because they had to. I realized that the managers, execs, department heads, etc. were getting in the way.

So, a few months ago I decided to get rid of all the layers. Instead of a rigid hierarchy, I flattened the structure, threw out fancy titles, and reorganized the whole company into teams. It wasn’t an easy shift–it quickly became clear that some positions previously amounted to “middle men” and weren’t entirely necessary anymore, so I had to let some people go. We’re still adjusting, but I can say that even though we’re only a few months into it, it’s working: We all work in teams that self-manage. There’s no need for bosses or management to nag and tell people what to do. And productivity and motivation are through the roof.

Continue reading at Want Happier Employees? Get Rid of the Bosses